Sunday, June 18, 2017

The Best Metals For those of Us With Metal Allergies

I have thought about this for a long time as I have allergies to some metals in ear wires. I have to wear metals with no nickel at all. I have read that even some sterling can have a bit of nickel in it so those of us who make jewelry for others have to be sure of our sources. Be sure to buy sterling from reputable sellers who verify that it is nickle free.  I found some great info online about the best metals to use especially for ear wires as they do more than just lay on the skin like a bracelet or necklace. I have decided to go with black niobium and copper as they are both 99.99% pure and have no nickel in them. When asked  I can also make sterling silver ear wires as I know my silver has no nickel in it. Here is some great info I found from a lovely artist who strives to create nickel-free jewelry as I do.

Safe Metals 

Niobium
Niobium is 99.99% pure. It does not react to skin chemistry, and will never corrode or tarnish. It is the safest metal for allergy sufferers to wear. It is used for surgical implants. From a jeweler’s point of view Niobium is fabulous because it can be easily shaped, is as strong as steel, and has a natural shine. It can be anodized to be a rainbow of colors. 

It is a pure element, not combined with any other metal. It does not cause problems that alloys may cause.  Even if you have never been able to wear metal jewelry comfortably, you will be able to wear Niobium. 

Argentium Sterling Silver
Argentium Sterling Silver, also called Argentium Silver or Non-Tarnish Silver, is made of 93.5% pure silver, even a little more than traditional Sterling Silver. It also contains about the same amount of copper, but it also has a small amount of germanium. Germanium acts as a hardener, and has the added benefit of making the silver tarnish-resistant. It is guaranteed to be nickel-free. It is actually whiter and brighter than Platinum and White Gold, and maintains its shine with very little care.

Brass and Bronze
Brass is made of copper and zinc. Bronze is made of copper and tin. These are nickel-free and beautiful all by themselves. Bare metals or oxidized metals are nickel-free, and beautiful to wear. 

Modern-day brass is not produced with lead, although it never hurts to ask. Avoid “antique” brass, or brass of uncertain origin. If it passes your questions, wear it and enjoy!

Pewter
Pewter might be considered to be the inverse of bronze. Instead of copper with a little tin, it is tin with a little copper. This may be an oversimplification since other minor ingredients may include antimony, bismuth, or silver, but it is decidedly nickel-free. Tin, itself has quite a noble history, and is actually classified as a precious metal. Although pewter used to be combined with lead, it no longer is. Avoid “antique” pewter, or pewter of uncertain origin. Ask your questions, and enjoy wearing this versatile metal.

99.9% Pure Copper
Pure copper is allergy-safe. If you can be certain it has not been alloyed with nickel, it’s lovely to wear. Enameled or oxidized copper is generally fine, though be cautious of “antique” plating, as I mentioned under Brass and Bronze. It does tarnish easily, and may turn your skin green.

Metals to be Cautious About 

Sterling Silver
Although 925 Sterling Silver is often nickel-free, it is not always nickel-free. To me, that is a big difference. What the number means is that 92.5% of the metal is pure silver, the remaining 7.5% is copper, and trace elements of some other metal that is used as a hardener. This trace metal may be zinc, tin, boron, lithium, germanium, platinum, indium, or it may be nickel. If it is guaranteed by the supplier to be free of nickel, you can enjoy it for years to come. 

Surgical Stainless Steel
Although Surgical Stainless Steel does not cause a reaction in many people, it does in fact contain 8% to 12% nickel. This nickel is chemically bound to the other metal that is there, so that, in theory, it does not leech out into the skin.  You may or may not have any problems with wearing Surgical Stainless Steel. If you can wear it without problems, it can be a nice option. 

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Art Elements Component of the Month Reveal

Woo hoo! I am excited about this reveal as the components are so unique and awesome. I love Lindsay's work! She said she was trying something new - making leather cabochons - but I can't tell she is new at it. They are fantastic! So, I entered and was selected to be a participant in the January component of the Month Reveal. Yay!

Here are some pics of the pieces she made. I hope you don't mind me sharing them, Lindsay. They are so awesome. When you see my work you will easily see which cabochon I got in the mail from Lindsay.




At first viewing of the cabs online I thought they would be perfect for a free form aboriginal design in seed beads. Can't you see that in the dotted designs on the cabs? But when I received my piece the rounded edges lent it to a more organic shape. Often times, I do let the focal decide where it wants to go. I had picked out all sorts of beads large and small in anticipation of the cab coming in the mail. All shades of browns and oranges and off white. Jaspers of all shapes and some dizi beads and bone.  I always gather more beads than I need and lots of choices. I had a plan! LOL
 But when I got it under my Ott light I realized it had more of a berry tone to it. So, I went back to digging in my beads and came out with some garnet rounds and some seed beads that blended with it. I had to order more garnet in a smaller size, too. I hope you all are not disappointed. So often the focal bead will direct the path of the creation.  I'm not sure if I will complete it as a bracelet, necklace or a brooch. Do you all have any ideas?  I thought maybe a necklace with flowing fringe at the bottom in small seed beads. But it would make a fab bracelet, too! Awesome work Lindsay. And thanks for selecting me to participate.
Without further ado......................





Niky